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Arkansas Catholic
Litlte Rock, Arkansas
October 8, 1927     Arkansas Catholic
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October 8, 1927
 

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THE GUARDIAN, OCTOBER 8, 1927 .......... ............... NI I] nil n Page Five Cardinals, Bishops From Every Devastated District, March With Huge Caskets To Great Douaumon Ossuary Office of Dead In- toned "Victory Bell" Blessed. Paris. Sept. 29. Two days before members of the American Legion received by M. Poincare at the of Douaumont, near Verdun, ceremony took place there which unprecedented in the history of world--the burial ceremony for 300,000 unidentified war ad. ,From every corner of France an of 30,000 people had to pay a last reverent tri- te these heroic defenders of country. At 2 o'clock in the the sound of a canon over the silent throng. Then, a breathless hush, the great procession began its solemn It was headed by a Marshal France and forty generals, in full followed by the Archbishops Rheims and Lyons, in the crimson Cardinal's robes. Then came the of every French diocese been devastated during the and following the dignitaries of Church were carried fifty regi- flags, their silken folds torn ragged and stained by the storm i battle. Bodies Borne by Soldiers At last, after the colors they died in coffins borne high by of France, and covered by "tricolore" of their native land, brought the earthly remains of 7 a third of a million Frenchmen on the field of honor." Fit- at Douaumont, where the ter- 'ic battle of Verdun raged worst, the blasting breath of war a desert waste, a still unhealed, )rag wound in the fields of France, heroes will be interred, their a national shrine. After years of untiring effort, the impossible task of identifying them was given up, and they were carried to their last resting place in firty-two great cas- kets, one from each section of the front. To the haunting, solemn strains of the funeral march, the slow pro- cession wound its way up to the great white building, thl:ough its echoing portals, and into the Catholic chapel, where the flag-draped caskets will re- main until the completion of their fifty-two separte vaults. High in the tower above them, and beneath the great "Victory Bell," as darkness fell, a Marshal lighted for the first time the "Lantern of the Dead," which is to be kept ahvays burning, like the flame above the grave of the Unknown Soldier of France un- der the Arc de TriQmphe. Great Bell Is Blessed This slymbolic rite completed, the illustrious soldier descended once more to the chapel to begin his fun- eral watch by the remains of his former companions in arms, while in the gathering darkness and by the light of flickering candles, the Bishops began to recite the Office of the Dead. All night a solemn vigil was kept, and the following morning the chapel was blessed by the Cardinals and by the Archbishops of Cambrai, Msgr. Chollet, whose father was the school "teacher of one of the devastated vil- lages of Verdun. Msgr. G~nistry, Bishop of Verdun, then blessed the great bell in the tower, the gift of an American woman, Miss Anne Thoburn Vanburen, in the presence of its sponsors, the Princess de Poli- gnac and the Marquis Dadvisard. MUST FREE OF CLAN, SAYS GENERAL (By N. C. W. C. News Service.) Haute, Ind., Sept. 27.--- overnment in Indiana, and the plo of Indiana, must be released ,m the grip of super-government has been fastening on them," L. Gilliom, Attorney General Indiana and bitter foe of the Ku Klan in this state, declared in address here this evening before Hamilton Club. Gillom condemned the entire movement and the fanaticism bigotry it represents. He de- that his party, the Republican, align itself against super-gov- which, he asserted, was alien its principles. g conditions in Indiana, said : and intolerants der the leadership of individuals give their whole time to the ng and to the political- of intolerance and fanaticism undertaken to set up a super- in Indiana over political and over constitutional gov~ "These supergovernment groups succeeded in considerable de- in establishing their power over people of Indiana by making can- of both political parties in numbers primarily re- to them either under oaths super-allegiance, under c'orrupt or under the threat of mass- grou~u opposition "at the polls..More these groups undertake to direc~ police power over the through their own represents- such as the horse thief detective and specially authorized mciation attorneys. overshadowing issue before of Indiana in the next cam- will be whether we shall have representative government political parties or whether we have super-government by in- erant and fanatical minority EXECUTIONS BY WHOLESALE ARE t WORRYING TO U. S.I I (Continued from page 1.) I ,n whom to fasten the guilt forI train killing, merely, selected 18 [ known to oppose Calles' tyr-] and summarily executed them. despatches say nothing of a trial. is significant that despite this punishment of those "guilty" Southern Pacific has reduced its to Guadalajara to three a is the disquieting query ask- ed by many here: Knowing that this procedure is regularly followed by the present rulers of Mexico, is or is not the United States Government making itself indirectly responsible for the deaths of dozens of innocent persons in Mexico. Putting it in an- other "@ay, it is asked: Does not Calles, each time the United States protests at the killing of its citizens, seize upon the protest promptly as an excuse to line up and shoot a score of his enemies, then blandly an- nounce that those responsible have been punished? Time and again it is pointed out the same procedure is followed, and never does the Mexil- can governmen~ fail to find from six to a dozen of those "guilty" of the crime against which a protest is lodged. They are executed without trial. Then Mexico notifies the world and probably the United States State Department of these executions as evidencing the desire of the Calles administration to punish crime and maintain orderly government. Coupled with the Tepic slaughter are two reports, from other parts of Nayarit and from the State of Jal- isco. The first relates that the bodies of 38 men are hanging singly and in groups from telegraph poles along the railway line, and that these victims were summarily executed by Calles troops after farcical court- martials. The men were termed "rebels." The other report, issued by the presidential bureau itself, at Mexico City, is that 34 "Catholic fanatics" including a priest, were captt~red in Jalisco, summarily court- martialed and shot. Receiving the reports of these three, wholesale killings, many here wonder how long the American peo- ple will remain quiet while such out- rages are perpetrated at their very door. They point out that the worst charge against the victims was revo- lution, and that the penalty was sum- mary death. They then recall that excesses in Cuba, where~ the victims suffered no worse fate than being driven from their homes and herded in concentration c*amps, so outraged the American people" that they were ready for war when the Maine inci- dent came. Yet the Cubans were do- ing just as the Mexicans are doing now---revolting against tyranny. SPAIN SEEKS CURB ON INFANT DEATHS BY AIDING MOTHERS (By N. C. W. C. News Service) Madrid, Sept. 17.--A projected plan for obligatory insurance has been drawn up and presented to the Ministry of Labor, Commerce and Industry for approval. It is believ, ed that its enforcement will n~t only decrease infant mortality, but will tend to improve the physical' condi- tion of the population in general. The new bill includes provision for financial assistance, medical atten- tion and free pharmaceutical supplies for working mothers, as well as the free use of baby clinics. An obliga- tory rest period of unemployment for six weeks both before and after the birth also is specified. Financial assistance to be given under the proposed legislation would total not more than 200 pesetas for each birth. The funds from which these payments would be made would be supplied by contributions from the State, the women's employers and the women themselves, the share of the State to be 150 pesetas in every case, and the employers and employ- ed women to pay 6 pesetas a year each in every case. BRITISH LABOR VOTES SISTERS {)PEN NEW SANATORIUM E1 Paso, Texas. Tbe Sisters of St. Joseph whose Motherhouse is in Concordia, Kansas, have accepted the mana~'ement of the new St. Joseph t Sanatorium in E1 Paso, Texas The formal opening of the institution took place on September 1. Sister M. Ursula has been named superintend- ent. The work of the Sisters in this new field is the care of patients suf- fering from tuberculosis. The eli- mate of E1 Paso is extremely bene- ficial, The sanatorium lies in the foot- hill of Mount Franklin, high above the city and has a commanding view of the Rio Grande Valley. Doctor C. TO END RELATIONS E. Egbert, the medical director of the WITH RUSSIAN UNION sanatorium, has for years specialized in the care of tubercular cases. The (By N. C. W. C. News Service) Sisters have recently accepted by af-I London, Sept. 19. Soviet princi- filiation the St. Mary's Academy of ples have proved too strong meat for Silver City, New Mexico. Both in-I British labor, which by an over- stitutions are in the E1 Paso diocese. I whetming majority at the Trade [ I ST. Union Congress at Edinburgh, voted GERMANY IS COMING to break off relations with the Rus- sian Trade Unions. Recent world-wide activities of So- viet Russia have contributed to this overthrow by British labor, and the final straw was an insulting note to the Congress from Dogadoff, of the Russian Central Council of the Trade Unions, calling for the overthrow of capitalism. The voting on the motion for the break with the Russian unions was: For ...................................... 2,551,000 Against ................................. 620,000 The raihvaymen's vote was cast with the minority, but J. H. Thomas, their leader, expressed the view that had the opinion of the men been sought thc:-'r 326,000 voteswould have swelled the majority. J. R. Clynes, M. P., speaking in support of the General Council's re- commendation of the break, said he could not understand a mehtality which denounced assassination in one country and demanded it'in another. Murder, he said, was murder the world over. ARCHBISHOP DAEGER TO BLESS CATECHIST CENTER, OCTOBER 2 Santa Fe, New Mexico, Sept. 23.-- Following the celebration of a Sol- emn Pontifical High Mass, on Octo- ber 2, the Most Rev. Albert T. Dae- ger, D. D., O. F. M., Archbishop of Santa Fe, will solemnly bless the Mission Center of" the Society of Missionary Catechists at Carrillos, New Mexico. This center was estab- lished by the Society on the Feast of Our Blessed Lady of Victory, May 24, 1927. Confining themselves to work of a non-institutional character, members of the Society of Missionary Cate- chists, of which Archbishop Deager is honorary president, devote them- seh;es to the task of imparting reli- gious instruction to needy neglected children living in mission places and settlements. Consecrated to the service of the poor, these missioners combine nursing and social service work with their catechetical labors. Upon the completion of their two- year training course, they pronounce simple vows for one year and are sent in bands of two or th~ree to the poor, neglected mission district as- signed them by the bishop of the dlocese. In the midst of one of the mining districts of New Mexico, Carrillos af- fords a splendid field for their mis- sionary and charitable labors. From this center the catechists take care of several other mission settlements, the largest of which is Madrid. BACK, U. S. TRADE ATTACHE DECLARES Washington, D. C. Germany is coming back, says Assistant Commer- cial Attache Douglas Miller, repre- sentative of the department of com- merce at Berlin for the past three years, just returned to the United States for conference with American business men. Gernmny is trying hard to adjust industry to modern conditions, and business men in Germany are looking to America for ideas in efficient man- ufacture. Many German manufactur- ers are reported planning the Ameri- canization of many of their factories, offices and shops. Germany's foreign trade has now almost recovered to the 1913 level. In Asia, German exports during 1926 were 69 per cent more in value than in 1913, in Africa, 15 per cen~ more, in North and South'America, 4 per cent more. Europe, the only region to take less materials from Germany, shows a 10 per cent decline from pre-war agetages. Chemical Plants Take up New Lines German sales in the Scandinavian countries and Holland have been at high figures, but France and Great Britain show declines from 1913 of two-thirds and one-fifth, respectively in 1926. These figures, however, do not include reparation deliveries in kinck With this item added, the Ger- man commodity trade balance for 1926 was favorable to the extent of about 1,000,000,000 marks, compared with an adverse pre-war balance of the same amount. Although the real income of the German people has not yet reached the pre-war figure, certain industries have improved their position. The chemical plants, for example, which lost most of their former export busi- ness in dyestuffs, have built up in its place a production of fixed nitrogen, with unlitnited possibilities for expan- sion, a number of synthetic com- pounds such as artificial wood alcohol and artificial petroleum. An experi- mental plant with a capacity of 1,000 tons per day is now going up in central Germany, where petroleum will be made from low-grade coal. METHODIST LEADER HITS LACK OF HOME RELIGIOUS TEACHING Austin, Minn.---Dismissal of reli- gious responsibility by parents to agencies outside of the home marks a master tragedy of this generation, in the opinion of Bert Edward Smith, D. D., superintendent adult department of board of Sunday schools in Methor dist Episcopal church, who addressed ,_, delegates to the Minnesota Methodist ABBOT BESTOWS JUBILARIAN 5] .... ere CR WN ON HIS Sl ER /~piscopal conIerence n . O OWN ST ,, t There never can be a substitute London, Sept. 26. An Abbot be-]for the home as a school or rehgmn," is Mother Mary Benedict White, who was professed a Canoness Regular of the Perpetual Adoration fifty years ago. Abbot White preached a sermon on the text "Mary has chosen the best part." Meanwhile the jubilarian's candle, intertwined with flowers, wa~ burning on the altar as the symbol of her religious life. Then followed the benediction of the nun's staff around which flowers and ferns were twined, and of her floral crown. The staff is a type of the Cross, which is to be her protection from enemies , visible and invisible, to increase her spiri- tual and corporal strength, and to en- able her to cross "the Jordan of this world" into the land of eternal prom- ise. Abbot White then placed upon his sister's head the crown of white roses, pronounced a benediction, and sprinkled holy water upon her. Dr. Smith also pc inted out that all the radical changes that have taken place in the social order have reacted on the home life. "The simplicity and solidarity of home life has been largely over- thrown," Dr. Smith continued. "There was a day when the business, social educational, religious and recreation- al interests centered in the home. "Business heads down town, pro- visions are ordered by telephone, the social interests center ir~ the club or lodge, the play impulses are satisfied on the playground or in the gymna- sium, the education of our children is entrusted to the public school and the religious instruction of youth is largely delegated to some other insti- tution." The transfer of these interests from the home gives rise to some very grave dangers, Dr. Smith con- cluded. olm'e rm/narp SECURING FOR THE DIOCESE OF LITTLE ROCK THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF 'WORTHY ECCLESIASTICAL STUDENTS IN ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY FOR THE ARKANSAS PRIESTHOOD Any Full Burse or Share in an Incomplete Burse May Be Do- nated. An Incomplete Burse Will Be Gratefully Received and Recorded. A Burse Is a Sum of Money Invested'. and Drawing Enough Interest Always Provide Board, Lodging and Training for One Seminarian. ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY BURSES. COMPLETE MARY'S BURSE, Hot Springs ........................................ $5,000.00 MONSIGNOR TOBIN BURSE, Little Rock ........................... 5,000.00 ANNIE JONES BURSE, Pine Bluff .................................... : ........ 5,000.00 MARY HOLLAND-CRAIG BURSE, Pine Bluff ....................... 5,000.00 INCOMPLETE BISHOP BYRE BURSE ......................................... ~ ........................... $4,497.47 ST. JOHN'S ALUMNI BURSE ......................................................... 4,961.50 SACRED HEART BURSE .............................................................. 320.00 BISHOP FITZGERALD BURSE ................................. : ........ 100.00 KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, ARKANSAS ................................. 392.00 INCOMPLETE BURSES BISHOP BYRNE BURSE The Burse to be known as the Bishop Byrne, a memorial honor to the first Bishop of the Diocese of Little Rock, already has a credit deposit of $4.447.47. This Burse calls for no stated amount of donation, and its present sum total is the result of large and small donations by those interested in perpetuating the name of Bishop Byrne in connection with the priesthood of the diocese which he organized and unto which he gave of his prayers, of his work, and of his life. The Bishop Byrne Burse is a popular one, toward which even donations of one dime or more will be acceptable and re- ceive due credit on the Seminary records. Previously acknowledged ..................................................... $3,528.47 Pupils of Sacred Heart Academy, Helena, Ark ....................... 10.00 Catholic Daughters of America, Fort Smith, Ark ....................... 100.00 Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Hot Springs, Ark .......................... 50.00 Ignatian Knights, S. H. Academy, Helena, Ark .................... 25.00 "Kindly" 8.00 ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY ALUMNI BURSE Previously acknowledged ..................................................... $2,081.50 Bequest of Mrs. Bridget Sinnott, Little Rock, Ark ............. 50000 Bequest of Late Mrs. Bridget Sinnott .............................. 500.00 Alumnus 1923 ....................................................... 500.00 Donation from I~vy .................................................... Anonymous, Hot Springs, Ark ................................................... Ignatiaa Knights, Helena, Ark .......................................... "Children of Sacred Heart Academy, Helena, Ark. Pupils of St. Anne's Academy, Fort Smith, Ark ............... St. Andrew's Cathedral School Children Thanksgiving ................................................... Pupils of St. Anne's Academy, Fort Smith, Ark ............. -=-..- "Cathedral School Pupils Our Lady of the Holy Souls Pupils ........ Miss Frizzell, Fort Smith ............................................................... 1.00 50.00 10.00 35.00 20.00 75.00 10.00 80.00 25.00 5.00 50.00 Total ....................................................................................... $4.497.47 This Burse is a foundation by the priests who have been ordained from the Seminary and is open to the clergy and the people in general as a recognition of the present-day success of the faculty and the students of this important diocesan insti- tution. BISHOP FITZGERALD BURSE Very Rev. Monsignor A. P. Gallagher, Mena, Ark, $I00.00 Alumnus 1916 800.00 Miss Bridget Boyle, North Little Rock, Ark ...................... 1,000.00 Alumnus 1926 ....................................................... 100.00 Alumnus 1917 100.00 Alumnus 1917 .................................................... 100.00 The Catholic Daughters of America, Fort Smith, Ark ................. 100.00 Friends, Slovactown, Ark ......................................... 10.00 Thanksgiving, Hot Springs, Ark ..................................... 50.00 Mr. W. B. Healey I00.00 Alumnus 1922 ................................................................. 20.00 Alumnus 1925 .................................................................. 20.00 Alumnus 1926 ......................................................... 20.00 Alumnus 1916 ............................. ~ .................... 20.00 Alumnus 1919 ......................................................... 20.00 Alumnus 1926 ................................................... 20.00 Total ..................................................................... $4,961.5e SACRED HEART BURSE Grateful Recipient of Favors .................................... $ i00.00 Morrilton Friend ........................................................ 8.00 Grateful Recipient of Favors ............................................... 50.00 Anonymous Donation .............................................. 8.00~ "Kindly" _ ...................................................................... 10.00 Recipient of Many Favors, McRae, Ark .............................. 10.00 Grateful Recipient of Favors, Memphis, Tenn ........................... 5.00 A Brockton Friend ..................................................... 100 25.00 5.00 5.00 8.00 4.00 I0.00 20.00 Thanksgiving, Anohymous, Pocahontas, Ark. ~ 2.00 Thanksgiving for Favors Received, Little Rock ........................ 25.00 Thanksgiving for Favors Received, anonymous, Little Rock ...... 25.00 Mrs. Chas. Coleman, Little Rock ............................................ 10.00 Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Little Rock, Ark ...................... Thanksgiving for Favors Received ............................... "Kindly," Cathedral Parish ........................ A. J. P., Morrilton, Ark ................................. =. .... -:-- Friend from Paris, Ark ...................................................... Anonymous .................................................... -~ ......... Thanksgiving for Favors Received ................................ -~---- ' 0 Total ................................................................................... _.$320.0 KNIGHTS OF COI~UMBUS BURSE Arkansas K, of C. Councils .................... .$ 392.00 INFORMATION AND DONATIONS Request for further information regarding any or all ma~tors ing to the foundation of Burses and the benefits shared by co likewiee all donations should be seitt to the Rector, Rt: Rev/' H. Aretz,