Newspaper Archive of
Arkansas Catholic
Litlte Rock, Arkansas
September 24, 1927     Arkansas Catholic
PAGE 5     (5 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 5     (5 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
September 24, 1927
 

Newspaper Archive of Arkansas Catholic produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




THE GUARDIAN, SEPT. 24, 1927 Page Five HOLDIN6S life. The individual and separate 'wild animals; their weapons were the ceive the education which will bring organs of his being form them- rudest of man made impliments, him success in the years to come." [MILLIONS selves gradually into an harmonic Being Nomads, the most difficult[ Reception By Faculty whole, and build up humanity in the and of necessity the first undcrtak- Following the formal exercises image of God." ing of the Church was to educate short sessions of all classes were TAKEN/tnjtRV CALLES How obvious is the meaning of them to the soil. Having accomplish- held at which time the students were these words. Are we not, as in- ed this she did not stop no for she is given an opportunity to meet with rants, like the seed? We are bornindefatigable in her work as a teach- their Professors. It was a highly perty "Nationalized" Includes with latent capacities which must be or. Her next step was the teaching successful openin$ and one which left School~, Rectories and Halls developed during life into that un- of the arts, rudimentary at first, but its impress on the student body. Valued at $50,000,000. By N. C. W. C. News Service) City, Sept. 1 .In some- more than a year, Excelsior, errs here, the Mexican govern- has nationalized Catholic prop- valued at 100,000.000 posses, $50,000,000. prioperties do not include church buildings themselves, but rather the generally much larger adjoin the church and as the parochial residence, and general headquarters for activities. It is said that church annexes, valued at 73,- pesos, have been confiscated last year or so. church properties have been under the enabling acts that the Constitution of 1917. this report is current here has been drawn to the re- of the Mexican National Rail- which shows that the net in- for the month of June, 1927, more than $1,000,000 less than the same month of a year before. net returns for June, 1927, were 668 as compared with $1,173,- in June, 1926. Calles' Guard Increased time it is revealed that Presidential Guard, which form- consisted of one battalion of In- and one regiment of Cavalry, been doubled to consist of two battalions and tow Calvary young women, both married single, of prominent families, been arrested on the charge of seditious propaganda, to word received from ara. police are now arresting every discovered participating in acts in private homes, word Gaudalajara says. It is also that two priests have been there and deported to this where they are to be arraigned the Secretary of Gobernacion. entire Catholic population is alarmed by the unusual steps the authorities are taking. SPICIOUS ANNUAL OPENING LITTLE ROCK COLLEGE ITS TWENTY-FIRST YEAR (Continued from page 1.) ago this month, on the present of Saint John's Seminary, Little the same ceremony, which you witnessed, was enacted before smaller group of young men is here present this morning, on occasion of the opening of Little College. Right Reverend Bishop--- as he did, the crying need an institution of the type spon- by the greatest of all teachers, Catholic Church, made possible school; and that morning nearly of a century ago, the plans dreams of the Bishop became a Catholic College---the only col- the City of Little Rock. And those walls that morning this group of young men had as- They were there for a pur.- They sought something, some- worth while and that some- was nothing else other than we went back over the span of which separate us from that day we would witness, September, a reenactment of initial scene; new faces, yes, identically the same expression those faces portraying the one whole-hearted determin- to attain that for which the was founded. in like manner, this Septem- not at all different from those today you assemble here so doing evince your purpose, desire and determination to he- that journey, the termination of is that much desired goal--- acquiring of an education. what is this goal, this ideal which you are striving? that great educator, it when he so beautifully "Sound education stands before symbolized by a tree planted fertilizing waters. A little l, which contains the design of the its form and proportions, is in the soil. See how it ger- and expands into trunk, leaves, flowers, and fruit! whole tree is an uninterrupted of organic parts, the plan of existed in its seed and root. is similar to the tree. In the child are hidden those which are to unfold during interrupted chain of parts, that one harmonic whole, which, and only which, will fit each individual to ful- fill all his duties to God, to Fellow- man and to Self. Which will fit him to obtain the best out of the present life without in any way jeopardizing his eternal salvation, to which, after all, everything else is secondary, and which is to be the reward of glorify- ing God in this world, whatever our condition or position might be. Education then is the development of the whole man--not one particular phase. It is not simply the acquiring of knowledge, or the development of the intellect, or the formation of character. No it is a combination of all -it is the complete human devel- opment-the finished result being a noble manhood, whose highest exem- plification, the ideal of all culture, is Christ. Now the elements of this manhood, my friends, are a healthy body, a clear and well informed intellect, sensibilities quickly susceptible to every right feeling and a steady will whose volitions are determined by right reason and an enlightened con- science. It therefore follows, that in its in- cipiency the work of education must necessarily be in the home, but for obvious reasons it is continued in in- stitutions where teachers take the place of the parents. Consequently, that good accom- plished in the very early education of the child must not be torn down and destroyed in later life when he enters an institution of higher learn- ing. On the contrary it should be continued and developed, reaching, as far as possible, the state of per- fection. So it behooves you then, in the selection of your school, to take into consideration that vital factor of whether this or that school can and does offer you the true and sound education which will fully equip you for your battle in life. If it does--- then register. If not---then beware. If there are some who have not considered this fact, then quite na- turally the question uppermost in their minds now is. "Does Little Rock College, the school of my choice, meet these requirements? Can she give me this true education " And I will answer by telling you that possibly to many here present it will seem incredible when I say that true education, the education which you seek owes its very existence, its justification, and to no small extent the means by which it continues to work, to the Catholic Church, that Church under whose auspices the in- stitution you have chosen is conduct- ed. My contention is clear and I mince no words in making it. From the very beginning she has been a teacher and will continue so throughout all time. She received her Charter as a teach- ing institution from Christ Himself when He told His Apostles, "Going therefore, teach ye all nations." True these words refer directly to the doctrine of salvation but never- theless they carry with them the obli- gation of insisting on certain prin- ciples and maintaining certain char- acteristics which have"a decisive bear- ing on all educational problems. Consider the magnitude of her task by contrasting those words, "Teach ye all nations," with the highest conception of the Pagan World. "All Nations," certainly and immediately implies universally, everyone--not the chosen few; while on the other hand, the cultured Greeks despised the Barbarian; the Roman had nothing but contempt for the outside nations, considering them only as subjects which were to be governed rather than taught. But with that command, "Teach ye all nations.'---the distinctions which had hitherto existed were set aside and Christianity appeared as one vast school with mankind at large as its pupils. How she has carried on, with the help of the Master who commission- ed her, is evidenced by the work she has accomplished. You are aware that when the Em- pire gave way before the Barbarian Invasion and was overrun by the vig- orous races of the North, how she, witb this vast field of activity open- ed to her, immediately set to work and brought order out of chaos. To appreciate fully this particular part of her work you must not forget for one minute just what these Barbar- ians were. Theirs was ignorance personified. They lived on roots and the raw meat of beasts killed many times with their bare hands; they covered their bodies with the skins of gradually working into the higher and finer, so that those monuments of architecture, painting, sculpture and so on that stand in Europe today are a result of the Catholic Church, the greatest of all school masters. And during one thousand years of medieval life the plastic hand of the Church fashioned the minds of the peoples and races of Europe and the near East, developing the whole man, making them what they are, despite much apostacy and ingratitude. She alone, for example, kept alive the great keyart of learning, the art of writing. This was done in the countless monasteries by the labor- ious process of copying. It was these teller's hands that saved hundreds of volumes of the Greek and Latin Classics. Without these scribes she could not have created and kept alive in every land of Europe, the schools and libraries in which tradition of learning, both secular and ecclesiasti- cal, was carried down the ages. How forceful is this point carried home by the words of that illustrious schol- ar, Cardinal Newman, when he said, "There is not a man in England, to- day, who using his power of speech to malign the Catholic Church, but owes to her the. fact that he can speak at .all." And there are many more in- stances, too numerous in fact to be treated in the short time we have, which, like those I have mentioned, prove conclusively the statement I have made. Hence, in conclusion, we have seen that the Church, under whose aus- pices the school you have chosen is conducted, has safeguarded at all times true education. She has not allowed it to become contaminated with any of the many harmful inno- vations which so called reformers are ever seeking to introduce. She has always maintained that the work of education is the development of th~ whole man, which development will fit him to fulfill well all of his duties to God, to Society. and to himself. Furthermore, she has been doing this work for some 1900 years--she is doing it today and long after we are gone she will continue in it. And just as she gave it to your ancestors she will give it to you, pro- vided however, that you co-operate. She can lead you to it, but she can- not make you drink. So therefore it is incumbent on your part to take advantage of your opportunity. Some of you are here at the sac- rifice of your good parents; to others the possibility of entering is the re- sult of many arduous and tedious hours of labor; and still others pos- sibly had not the above to consider when registering as students. But, however, you are here, let us always remember that it is for one and the same purpose, so make the most of your time, use it to every advantage, in order that you will finish the tru- ly developed man, the result of a true education. Patriotic Exercises On The Oval At the conclusion of the religious ceremonies the students formed in procession outside of the chapel and marched to the Oval where the pat- riotic exercises were held. Due to the fact that the Rev. Thomas L. Keany, Ph. D., Dean of Studies had been taken suddenly ill the previous day, the patriotic exercises were in charge of Father Strassner. The march to the Gymnasium followed and the final exercises of the morn- ing took place with the reading of the rules by the Rev. Joseph M. Burns, A. M., Prefect of Discipline and an address by the President. Father Moran, the President of the College stressed tl~e importance of loyalty to the college and to .its aims as the most important duty of each student. "It fs Loyalty," he said, which makes the athletic strive for victory when he is engaged in up- holding the honor of his college in physical contests. He thinks not of personal reward. He is satisfied to know that his college is winning the palm of victory. It is loyalty which makes the professor labor long and earnestly into the night, to secure the greatest amount of suc.cess in the work of his pupils. It is loyalty on the part of the Alumni which brings to the college the honors which a loving son would lay at the feet~of his Alma Mater, from whom he has received the weapons in the struggle for existence and success." "This is the loyalty which every student at Little Rock College should have---a loyalty which thinks not of personal gain or reward---a loyalty which urges him to do everything in his power to further the interests of his college from whom he is to re- Dr. Keany .Missed The only incident to mar the hap-] )iness of the occasion was the illnessl of the Rev. Dr. Keany. Word reach-[ ed the college that Dr. Keany hadt successfully undergone a minor oper-] ation at St. Vincent's Infirmary and was resting comfortably. In the ab- sence of Dr. Keany, and through the kindness of the Very Rev. Dr. S. J. Peoples, Vice Rector of St. John's Diocesan Seminary, the Rev. John McCauley, A. M., of the Seminary Faculty was appointed to assist at the college. Father Dully assumed temporarily the classes of Dr. Keany while Father McCauley took charge of the classes of Father Dully. It is expected that Dr. Keany will be able to resume his work at the college during the coming week. New Faculty Members New additions to the faculty for the coming year are: the Rev. John J. Healy, A. M., who will act as assist- ant Prefect of Discipline, Prof. Charles Hoffman, A. M., who will have charge of the Business De- partment, Prof. John J. McLochlin, M. S., of the University of Indiana, who is to have charge of the Science Department, Miss Rose Bernier, Sec- retary and Miss Ruth Osborne who will act as Librarian. KLAN HEADS BLAMED IN COLORADO MAN'S DEATH FROM BEATING (By N. C. W. C. News Service) Pueblo, Colo., Sept. 16. Suits totaling $100,000 were filed here last week against Dr. Hiram Wesley Evans, imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, a~nd a group of local men, in connection with the death July 31, 1926, of John Brown, a Klans- man, who. according to the suits, died of bodily injuries suffered after he tried to withdraw from the organiza- tion. The suits, which came on a day when Evans made a vicious attack on the Catholic Church and Alfred E. Smith, Gov~rnor of New York, at a Pueblo meeting, are brought by Mary Brown, widow of the Klansman, and her 16-year-old daughter Juanita. They say that Brown on July 30, 1926, attended a Klan meeting at a dry reservoir two miles north of Pueblo, at which it is alleged he told the Klan officials he was withdraw- ing from the organization. The plaintiffs alleged that he was at- tacked, beaten and suffered bodily injuries, from which he died the nex~ night. A score or more of Pueblo citizens are included in the group of indivi- dual defendants, named in the suits besides Dr. Evans. TWI~LVE AT MEETING OF C. U. TRUSTEES Washington, Sept~ 13.---TwelVe membexs of the Hierarchy and three laymen we~'e present at the Fall meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Catholic University of America, which took place in Caldwell Hall at the University here today. Routine matters were discussed, the Rt. Rev. Joseph Schrembs, Bishop of Cleveland and secretary of the Board, said following the meeting. Members of the Hierarchy pres- ent, besides Bishop Schrembs, were Cardinal O'Connell of Boston, Card- inal Mundelein of Chicago, Cardinal Hayes of New York, Archbishop Daeger of Santa Fe, Archbishop Dowling of St. Paul, Archbishop Hanna of San Francisco, Bishop Boyle of Pittsburgh, Bishop Lillis of Kansas City, Bishop Shahan, Rector of the University, Archbishop Shaw of New Orleans and Bishop Turner of Buffalo, Laymen present were James J. Ryan and John J. Sullivan of Philadelphia. and Clarence E. Mar- tin of Martinsbur, g, West Virginia. PHILADELPHIA K. OF C. HONOR J. A. FLAHERTY Philadelphia, Sept. 6.---James A. Flaherty, supreme counsellor of the Kfiights of Columbus and past su- preme knight of the order, was guest of honor at a homecoming reception tendered by 200 members of the Philadelphia Council here Tuesday night. He was presented by Judge John Monaghan, the presiding offi- cer, with a bound book in which were engraved the names of the members of the Council. Mr. Flaherty is a charter member and one of the founders of the local body, organized in 1893. Ten other of the 13 living charter members of the Council were present at the re- ception. eminar SECURING FOR THE DIOCESE OF LITTLE ROCK THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF WORTHY ECCLESIASTICAL STUDENTS IN ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY FOR THE ARKANSAS PRIESTHOOD Any Full Burse or Share in an Incomplete Burse May Be Da- nated. An Incomplete Burse Will Be Gratefully Received and Recorded. A Burse Is a Sum of Money Invested and Drawing Enough Interest Always to Provide Board, Lodging and Training for One Seminarian. t ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY BURSES. I COMPLETE ST. MARY'S BURSE, Hot Springs $5,000.00 MONSIGNOR TOBIN BURSE, Little Rock .... 5,000.00 ANNIE JONES BURSE, Pine Bluff 5,000.00 MARY HOLLAND-CRAIG BURSE, Pine Bluff 5,000.00 INCOMPLETE BISHOP BYRE BURSE ......... - ................................................. $4,497.47 ST. JOHN'S ALUMNI BURSE 4,961.50 SACRED HEART BURSE ........................................................... 320.00 BISHOP FITZGERALD BURSE 100.00 KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, ARKANSAS 392.00 INCOMPLETE BURSES BISHOP BYRNE BURSE The Burse to be known as the Bishop Byrne, a memorial honor to the first Bishop of the Diocese of Little Rock, already has a credit deposit of $4,447.47. This Burse calls for no stated amount of donation, and its present sum total is the result of large and small donations by those interested in perpetuating the name of Bishop Byrne in connection with the priesthood of the diocese which he organized and unto which he gave of his prayers, of his work, and of his life. The Bishop Byrne Burse is a popular one, toward which even donations of one dime or more will be acceptable and re- ceive due credit on the Seminary records. Previously acknowledged .............................................. $3,528.47 Pupils of Sacred Heart Academy, Helena, Ark._ _ 10.00 Catholic Daughters of America, Fort Smith, Ark. 100.00 Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Hot Springs, Ark .................. 50.00 Ignatian Knights, S. H. Academy, Helena, Ark ............. 25.00 "Kindly" 3.00 ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY ALUMNI BURSE Previously acknowledged .......................................... $2,081.50 Bequest of Mrs. Bridget Sinnott, Little Rock, Ark ......... 50"000 Bequest of Late Mrs. Bridget Sinnott ............. 500.00 Alumnus 1923 ................................................... ~ .............. 500.00 Donation from Levy ................................................. 1.00 Anonymous, Hot Springs, Ark .............................................. 50.00 Ignatian Knights, Helena, Ark .................................................. 10.00 Children of Sacred Heart Academy, Helena, Ark .............. 35.00 Pupils of St. Anne's Academy, Fort Smith, Ark ....................... 2~).00 St. Andrew's Cathedral School Children ......... _ .......... -" ........... 75.00 Thanksgiving ................................................................... i0.00 Pupils of St. Anne's Academy, Fort Smith, Ark .................... 30.90 Cathedral School Pupils ................................................... 25.00 Our Lady of the Holy Souls Pupils ........................................... 5.00 Miss Frizzell, Fort Smith .................................................................. 50.00 Total ......................................................................................... $4.497.47 This Burse is a foundation by the priests who have been ordained from the Seminary and is open to the clergy and the people in general as a recognition of the present-day success of the faculty and the students of this important diocesan insti- tution. BISHOP FITZGERALD BURSE Very Rev. Monsignor A. P. Gallagher, Mena, Ark ......................... $I00.00 Alumnus 1916 ....................................................................... 3OO.00 Miss Bridget Boyle, North Little Rock, Ark ............................. 1,000.00 Alumnus 1926 ................................................................... 100.00 Alumnus ]:917 ....................................................................... 100.00 Alumnus 1917 .................................................................... 100.00 The Catholic Daughters of America, Fort Smith, Ark ............. 100.00 Friends, Slovactown, Ark ........................................................... 10.00 Thanksgiving, Hot Springs, Ark ....................................... 50.00 Mr. W. B. Healey .......................................................... 100.00 Alumnus 1922 ..................................................... 20.00 Alumnus 1925 ........................................................... 20.00 Alumnus 1926 ................................................................ 20.00 Alumnus 1916 20.00 Alumnus 1919 ................................................ 20.00 Alumnus 1926 20.00 Total .$4,961.50 SACRED HEART BURSE GraCeful Recipient of Favors $ 1'00.00 Morrilton Friend 8.00 Grateful Recipient of Favors 50.00 Anonymous Donation 8.00 "Kindly" ........................................ 10.00 Recipient of Many Favors, McRae, Ark ............................. 10.00 Grateful Recipient of Favors, Memphis, Term ..... 5.00 A Brockton Friend ........................................ - ....... 100 Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Little Rock, Ark ........................ 25.00 Thanksgiving for Favors Received ....................................... 5.00 "Kindly," Cathedral Parish ............................................. ~- 5.00 A. J. P., Morrilton, Ark ........................................................ 3.00 Friend from Paris, Ark ...................................................... 4.00 Anonymous .............................................................. 10.0a Thanksgiving for Favors Received ............................. 20.00 Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Pocahontas, Ark. 2.00, Thanksgiving for Favors Received, Little Rock .......... 25.00' Thanksgiving for Favors Received, anonymous, Little Rock ..... 25.00 Mrs. Chas. Coleman, Little Rock ...................................................... 10.00 Total .............................................................................................. $320.00 KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BURSE Arkansas K. of C. Councils ...................................................... $ $92.00 INFORMATION AND DONATIONS Request for further information regarding any or all matters ing to the foundation of Burses and t likewise all donations should be sent to the Rector, Rt. Roy. Monsignor ! H. Aretz, St. John's Seminary. .......