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Arkansas Catholic
Litlte Rock, Arkansas
July 18, 1925     Arkansas Catholic
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July 18, 1925
 

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i !L! .i Page Four THE GUARDIAN, JULY 18, 1925. BISHOP M'NICHOLAS MADE' ARCHBISHOP OF CINCINNATI Bishop Chartraud Reappointed to In- dianapolis. (By N. C. W. C. News Settee.) Rome, July U).--The Rt. Rev. John T. McNicholas, Bishop of Duluth. re- cently designated Bishop of Indianal)- ells, has been appointed Archbishop of Cincinnati. The Rt. Rev. Joseph Chartrand, Bishop of "Indianapolis, designated Archbishop of Cincinnati, was reap-. pointed as Bishop of Indianapolis. Archbishop-elect McNicholas was born in 1877 at Kiltimagh, county Mayo, Ireland, and came to Americ with his parents when he was a child. He received his early education in the parochial schools of the hnmaculate Heart of Mary, Chester, Pa. Later, SIX SISTERS, 65 CHIL- DREN ARE HOMELESS IN ALASKA, MISSION BURNS Without Shelter, Cut Off From the Outside World, Community in Des- perate Cmdit:,m--Can Be Reached Only by Dog Sledge. I CALIFORNIA MISSIONS REPEATEDLY VISITED BY EARTHQUAKES Santa Barbara "l)amaged Beyond Re- pair" and Others Wrecked tn 1812. The accounts of the earthquake which shook down the fine facade of Santa Barbara MiMon, on June 29, (By N. C. W. C. News Service) bring back recollections of a similar Washington, July 6.--The Catholic event which destroyed that same rots- Sisters school at St. sion in 1812. The recent quake in missionary " ' Mary's% Akularak, far into the in- tensely cohl reaches of Alaska, was wiped out by fire July 3, says a tele- gram received by the Bureau of Cath- olic Indian missions here. Six Sisters and 65 girls are home- less and helpless. There is no accom- modation left at the mission t)tt a tiny house occupied by a priest. The only other shelter to be found is in scatterecl native igloos, or ice hute'. Aid can come only by clog sledge. The completeness of the disaster California was initiated by certain up- heavals in Montana, and whether the end has come with the trembler reg- istered at Tucson. Arizona, on July 7, no one can say. Seismic disturbances, once the equilibrium of the earth': crust has been upset by some'major event affecting it seriously, are apt to continue for some time, making themselves felt in widely separated parts of the earth's surface. Thu the sudden appearance of the islant he attended St. Joseph's College, and the desperate situation it creafe. Philadelphia, where he met the lato are tohl by the telegram to Msgr. Very Rev. C. H. McKenna, O. P., 'P. Hughes, Director of the Bureau, whic' Q., the apostle of the Rosary and the ] is signed by : ather Delon, Superior Holy Name in America, who had a of the Alaska Missions. It reads: great influence on the life of :the l young man. A Dominican. He entered the Dominican Order as a novice at 17, amt made his profes- sion at St. Rose Convent, Springfield, Ky., oldest Dominican establishment; in the country, in 1895 He pursued his philosophical and theological stud- ies at St. Joseph's Convent, Somerset, Ohio, where he was ordained in 1901. Later he continued his studies at the "Sisters' building, Akularak, Alas- ka, where Father Lonneaux resides, completely destroyed. Root" caught fire from spark, fanned by high sout- east wind. "Building reduced to ashes in little over an hour. No lives lost, but six nuns, sixty-five girls absolutely home- less and helpless. Chapel, classrooms, dormitory, kitchen, dining room, bakery, laundry, all total loss. Sabrina in the Azores on January 30. 1811, ushered in the terrible earth tremors which continued from May, that part of the coast, and unless building construction takes cognizance of that; clanger, every new earthquake will cause even greater losses of life anti property than those wifich have been. (C. B. of C. V.) FR. COHILL, IN CHINESE DANGER ZONE, IS SAFE, SAYS CABLE TO SISTER (By N. C. W. C. News Service.) Hancock, Md., July 10.Father William J. Cohill, American mission- ary in China for whose safety the State Department was concerned, is safe and has suffered no harm in the Chinese uprisings and wi{rs, he says in a cablegram just received here by Miss Louise Cohill, his sister. The cablegram coTsists of the single word, "safe." Father Cohill is stationed in one of the most troubled of the Chinese prov- inces. With him is Father Carl Roth, and in the same district is Father 1811, to June, 1813, shaking first[Francis X. Clougherty. It is assum- the West Indies and then certain sec- ied, from his :failure to mention either tions in the valley of the Mississippb E of the other priests, that they too are where their effectq may still be wit- safe. The State Department's fears nessed, especially in New Madrid county, Missouri. Besides, the main- land of South America was visited by a destructive earthquake, which com- pletely devastated Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It was this great disturbance of the earth's' crust which caused more than one catastrophe in California in 1812, "forever memorable as the year of earthquakes," says the venerable were aroused by the ['act that nothing [had been heard from the American I priests since before the outbreaks against foreigners. KENNY'S COFFEE Our Brands are perfect Blends --:the result of more than fifty years experience in roasting Convent of the Minerva, Rome, where "Must rebuild immediately before he received the degree Lector in Sa- September weather. We depend en- cred Theology. tirely on your charity." Returning to America in 1904, tie Situation Is Desperate. was made Master of Novices at St. The fire, it was explained at the Joseph's, Somerset, one of the most Bureau here, is the crowning tragedy import Dominican houses. While he of a series of three disasters which was holding this office, the Dominican House of Studies at Washington, "s- sociated with the Catholic University, was opened, and he was transferred to the new house to continue his super- vision of the studies of the Dominica2 tudents. National Holy Name Director. In 1908 he was made National Di. rector of the Holy Name Society in have visited the Alaska missions in two years. The school of St. Mary's was on ., of tfarthest mission points to the nortt in the interior of Alaska, and workers who have written of it tell of the intense cold and the barrenness of the landscape. "No imagination could picture the desolation of that scene," said awork - the United States, and established headluarters in New York. In addi- tion, he became editor of the Holy Name Journal. He was appointed pastor of St: Catherine's parish in New York City in 1913, and was elect- ed the first Prior of the convent at- tached to that parish in 1917 Shortly afterward, he was called to er at the Bureau here, describing the gravity of the situation. "Ice-clad mountains rear hoary heads into snow-laden skies, and miles and miles of frozen tundra stretch away before the eyes of these terror-stricken, des- titute Sisters and children. No soun't cheers the silence there, for not even the birds live in the awful cold. "Even the scattered igloos of the Rome by the Master General of the Eskimos are far removed from the Dominicans to act as Assistant Gen- I mission buildings which have burned. eral of the Order. While serving in Our missionaries had to go far in- this capacity, as representative of the tlan d because sites chosen when the English-speaking provinces, he was mission was first established were historian of mission times in that state, Rev. Zephyrin Engelhardt, O. F. M., who has lived to see his beloved Santa Barbara Mission the victim of another great seismic catastrophe. From the old records, into which he has delved so diligently, this historian has gained the impression that "the wildest terror prevailed in the terri- tory from Mission Purisima to Mis- sion San Juan Capistrano," during that time. Little wonder, since, as he writes, "at the former place all the buildings were wrecked, so that the Fathers removed to another locality on the other side of Santa Ines Riv- er." "At San Juan Capistrano," he continues, "the new stone church came down and crushed thirty-nine Indians under its ruins." It was in that year "the Church at Santa Barbara Mission was damaged beyond repair, so that another had to be erected." This was not, however, the first ac- quaintance of the missionaries with earthquakes in California. Very soon after the iounding of the Mission of San Diego, Portola's land expedition pushed on northward. Since Father Crespi, one of the two Fathers of the expedition, kept a diary, we are well informed on'what befell the Span- made Master of Sacred Theology and washed away by the Yukon. near appointed Provincial of Lithuania, an I whose banks it was desired to build ] lards on that memorable march which honorary office. He was notified of I "To communicate with the outside l tk them as far north as San Fran- his apointment as Bishop' of Duluth, I world, the missionary from St. Mary's cisco. Camping on the banks of a stream, which the sohliers called in 1918, and was consecrated before must travel 70 miles over the 175-1 Santa Anna, on July 28, 1769, the leaving Rome, by Cardinal Boggiani, i mile trail to St. Michael, and meet the O P. I mail carrier who brings mail for his Fathem thought they should call the I place "El Dulcisimo Nombre de Jesus Canonist. mission. This 70 miles is made by de los Tremblores." "Because, as th Archbishop-elect McNicholas is an dog team over the frozen tundra. authority on Canon Law, and has written many articles for Catholic: magazines and newspapers. He is the author of the "Holy Name Manual," and in his term of office extended the Holy Name Society of every dio- cese in the country. : Bishop Chartrand. Bishop Chartrand was born in St. Louis in 1870, his father being a mem- "Nor is this the worst. Father Lonneaux, the young missionary who went last year to join the Jesuit pio- neers, Fathers Treca and "Lucchesi, wrote'us: 'I could travel in a straight line for twenty days and I would still be far from the end of my portion of our mission territory. ] attend 120 villages and four large camps.' "The school of St. Mary's was ber of an old French family. The opened for the little ones, more as a Jesuit College ---- c, _..._ TT--." .-- ,home than as a place for instruction  , LAUW ,lt. JUUI tJlllYt['-  ': ' " sit rovlded hi Inc,dentally, it was thin pmus cme y, p ' "m his elementary ed-I " " _ " " _ .,' cation, and his first studies for th-/of the children that first taught Can- rmsthood were ma , ohc laymen and women m the Umted P " de at St. Meinrad s l .... " Benedictine." " abbey m' Ind'ana,1 where States the hardshipss undergone by the. good Father states, "four times dur- ing the day we had been roughly shaken up by earthquakes." One of the Indians, who happened to be in the camp, and whom Father Crespi took for a priest, or sorcerer, was no I less scared than the Spaniards. He I began to shout aloud in a hideou. voice, demonstrating fright and "turning in every direction the while." The explorers continued to experi- ence earthquakes for a number of days. The leader of the expedition, Portola, reports they felt four or five on the second of August, while Father Crespi records some others. All of he remained five years Alaska missionaries. Father Rup- these occurred in the Los Angeles re- ......  . . . I pert, eager that his little charge gion, which has now again been so upon compmung nis szuuies, n .... sorely afflicted. .... = ..... , _ }might have some httle Christmas 'mugn vwo years a . aexnraa s, he- " Thus have the Franciscans from the to ...... I presents he had collected, lost his life ing o young o ae oraamed to ne -- . -. : ........ very beginning of their missionary en- - . - ..  m ne ce zlems wnim rymg to deny- priesthood. It was nere, however, tnat er these bi's f " "" s " * deavors in Upper California been - ., . . _ ,  _  ' o cneer, his love :for e me ann vecame a zrxenu oI umnop  the c ............. made aware of the weakness of the .. ........ ....... mmren o ms flock, ms lonely narcaru o lnmanapols, in ,v ne .............. ...... ; .  , I (team, me mree-aay vigil o ms (rag earth's crust in that region. Because :aecompomeo ne msnop so tome, anti "'iR rig,. over nis .... oouy guarding away of this latter fact earthquakes are later studied at the Jesuit University wolves, and the grief of the children certain to occur again and again on in Innsbruck, Austria. Returning to 'ad Sisters first told of the heroism the United Stattes, he was ordained, of these missionaries." at Indianapolis in 1892 by Bishop It was the opinion at the Bureau Chatard. A special dispensation from here that there is clanger the Alaska Rome was required, because he was missions will have to be closed, cape- still about six months under the age cially ince the Bureau of Education for the priesthood. I has withdrawn the salaries paid to the He immediately became Bishop Sisters. This would involve, it was Chatard's secretary and assistant tee- explained, sending away 400 children tor of the Cathedral parish. In 1910, whom the missionaries have clothed, he was consecrated Titular Bishop of fed, and taught. It is impossible for lviawas and made Coadjutor B;shop of the religious to maintain themselveu :Indianapolis. Upon the death of by raising crops; all food except fish Bishop Chatard, in 1918, he became must be brought in. The disaster at Bishop of Indianapolis. [ St. Mary's was viewed here as par- From his long labors in Indianap.. ticularly tragic at this time, and al- dis, Bishop Cbartrand has attatmea :, most a death-blow at the great work wide popularit.% among non-Catholics c,o heroically begun in the North. :ds ell as Catholics. He "is regarded :as un outstanding civic leader. Par- "We're filming Robinson Crusoe. tcularly, he has become known as a (an 7;ou play Friday?" builder of schools, having constructed Nope;  t start before/MondaY, an admirable Catholic educational sys- said the actor addressed,--The Louis- .tern in his diocese, ville Courier-Journal. and blending only he choicest selection A trial will convince you. C. D. KENNY CO. 121 West 5th Telephone 4-1465 Office Phone Residence Phone 4-6401 3-0438 DR. E. F. HARRISON DENTIST $01 Hall Building Little Rock, Ark. M. A. BILTZ Representing the FIRRT Corrpany in the FIRST Business of the World. New York Life Insurance Company Assets: Over One Billion Dollars Phone 7446, Little Reek, Ark. 801-8 Southern Trust Bldg. IIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll HOLLENBERG MUSIC CO. Establisld 1853 The oldest, the largest and the best Piano, Graphophone and Organ house n Arkansas. 415 Main Street LI2rLE ROCK, ARK. 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 We Write All Forms of OLD LINE LEGAL RESERVE LIFE INSURANCE For Ages 10 to 65 If You Are Planning to Increase Your Life Insur- ance Protection Call or Write JEFF J. RALEY CENTRAL STATES LIFE INSURANCE CO. 416 So. Trust Bldg. Phone 6654 Little Rock, Ark. Anywhere in Arkansas BOGUS PRIEST, USING SEVERAL ALIASES, AT WORK, ORDER WARNS (By N. C. W. C. News Service.) Notre Dame, Ind., July 10. Com- plaints from several quarters are hc- ing rec.eived here at the Provincial ]louse of the Congregation of the Holy Crom of a beg'us priest who i: swindling numerous pc'rsons by rep:'e- senting himself to be a member of the ttoly Cross Order. Various names are used by the man, among them being the Rev. Ar- thur Barry O'Neill, the Rev. John Kelley and the Rev. James Gallagan. The incomplete description which it has been possible to gain of makes him a man of about 40 year, tall and thin. He seems well ed with the personnel of Notre Dane. University, conducted hy the ttol Cross Fathers here, and with sor .! o[' the community affairs. Usually he tell,s a story about haY" ing been at a tIoly Cross house baying an altercation with the ior (,r pastor, and says lie is on way to consult the higher su Sometimes he aslc,s for money, times for work and sometimes ::ecommendations so that he nlaY work. He always promises, it that he will refund any money him, as soon as he arrives at [ quarters. , 00aint 00lobn'00 00tmtnary SECURING FOR THE DIOCESE OF LITTLE RoOK EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF WORTKY ASTICAL STUDENTS IN ST. J'OHN'S SEMINAR* THE PRIESTHOOD OF ARKANSAS. Any Full Burse or Share in an Incomplete Burse May Be An Ivcomplete Burse Will Be Gratefully Received and corded.  1 A tCurse Is a Sum of Money Invested and Drawing Enoug eat Always to Provide Board, Lodging, and Training 1o Seminarian. ' ST, JOHN'S SEMINARY BURSES COMPLETE ST. MARY'S PARISH BURSE, Hot Springs MONSIGNOR TOBIN BURSE, Little Rock ....................... JONES BURSE, Pine Bluff ............................. HOLLAND-CRAIG BURSE, Pine Bluff ................... JOHN M. GRACIE BURSE, Little Rock ........................ INCOMPLETE BISHOP BYRNE BURSE ST. JOHN'S ALUMNI BURSE .............................................................. SACRED HEART BURSE ................................. INCOMPLETE BURSES Bishop Byrne Burse The t?ishop to be known as the Bishop Byrne, or to the first Bishop of the Diocese of Little Rock, credit deposit of $2,390.83. This burse calls for no of donation, and its present sum total is the result of small ddnations by those interested in perpetuating Bishop Byrne in connection witk the priesthood of which he,organized and unto which he gave of his work, and of his life. The Bishop Byrne Burse is a popular one, toward donations of one dime or more will be acceptable ad credit on the Seminary records. Previously acknowledged Pupils of Sacred Heart Academy, Helena, Ark ...................... Catholic Daughters of Amgerica, Fort Smith, Ark ................... Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Hot Springs ......................... Ignatian Knights, S. H. Academy, Helena ......................... "Kindly" _ .............................. -.--r .................... Donation from Levy ............................................. Total to date ......................................... St. John's Seminary Alumni Burse This Burse is a foundation by the priests who dained from the Seminary and is open to the clergy in general as a rdcognition of the present-day ulty and the students of this important diocesan Previously aekaowledged ................................. Alumnus 1915 .............................................. "" N. E. Deanery ................................................. Alumnus 19i5 .................................................. Alumnus 1924 ............................................... " Alumnus 1924 .................................................. Alumnus 1922 ....................................... Jr ...... " Bequest of Louis Koers, Little Rock .................................... .- ...................... Total ......................................................................................................................... Sacred Heart Burse Drateful Recipient of Favors ..... Morrilton Friend ............................................ .. Grateful Recipient of Favors ................................... .. Anonymous Donation ................................... " .... "Kindly" .................................................. 2-" Recipient of Many Favors, McRae, Ark ........................ ... Grateful Recipient of Favors, Memphis, Tenn .................. A Brockton Friend ................................................. Thanksgiving, Anonymous, Little Rock ............ .- ..... _ ....... ..- Thanksgiving for Favors Received ...................... "Kindly"--Cathedral Parish Total ............................................... INFORMATION AND DONATIONS Request for furtber information regarding any or all to the foundation of Burses and the benefits shared by contributOrs wise all donations shotfld be sent to the Rector, Rt. ReV. ]Aretz S. T, D., St. John's Seminary, TwentY-fifth and State [ Rock, Ark.