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Arkansas Catholic
Little Rock, Arkansas
May 7, 1927     Arkansas Catholic
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May 7, 1927
 

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Page Six THE GUARDIAN, MAY 7, 1927 Mission House Activities 1 St. Roman s Mission House l Land and $25.00 for the seminary Jonesboro, Arkansas ] will be considered large. In fact By Rev. R. J. Marmon larger than many places with more Weather conditions over which the Missionary has no control compelled us to make Knobel more or less a center at which to hold services dur- ing the month of April. On Sunday, April 3rd, Mass was offered up in the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson. The faithful were in attendance, and as usual re- ceived the sacraments. families and less expense. Divine providence was pleased that the glory of Christ's birth should be hidden in the obscurity of a poor stable in little Bethlehem. When the time for His passion the time when He showed His great love and charity for the human race arrived He chose for the ignominy ~of His passion the great theatre of*Jerusalem and the Pascal Time when the entire nation At an early hour that morning the of the Jews was assembled there. residents of the neighborhood were We behold Him entering the city startled by the alarm of fire. The with great shouts from the people-- home of Mr. Frank Robert, near that They welcome Him yet behold the of the Wilson residence was in flames and soon lay in ashes. The residence was owned by Mr. John Wilson. cry' little clothing and fur- niture was~ saved. It is believed that he fire started from a lamp. The Missionaries never know when they will bl called upon and for various duties in addition to that Of minister- ing t~ the salvation of souls they must be prepared for any emergency. Knobel First Friday devotions were con- ducted as usual on April 1st. Out of an attendance of 57 an even 50 re- ceived Holy Communion This oc- casion marked the highest number to reemve Their Sacramental Lord on First Friday. Most certainly will the Twelfth Promise of Our Lord be fulfilled in their regard, "They shall not die in My disgrace, nor without receiving their Sacraments; My Divine Heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment." However they must fulfill that obligation and receive Holy Com- munion for Nine successive months. To enable those who are not permitted to attend Mass Holy Communion is always distributed on First Fridays at 6:00 a. m. We know that the Sacraments were instituted by Our Blessed Lord as means where- by man is assisted on the journey through life to reach Heaven his eternal home. Let us therefore fol- low the injunction Of Our Blessed Saviour as recorded in the sixth chapter of St. Matthew--"But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven where neither rust nor moth doth consume, and where thieves do not break through nor steal. For where thy treasure is, there is thy heart also." May this be a reminder to those who at times are tempted to remain" away from the sacraments. Remember our principal object in life should be The Salvation of our immortal soul Where shall I spend eternity~ is a question that should ever be kept in our mind. On Palm Sunday the palms were blessed and distributed before the Mass. The way of the cross follow- ed~by the Benetliction~with the Most Blessed Sacrament concluded the services. The Passion was read in English to the faithful on Palm Sun- day--and the other days of the weeks by several members of the congregation, during the Mass. Holy Thursday 0n Holy Thursday the Junior Choir furnished the music for the High Mass and also sang the Pange, Lingua, during~the procession to the Repository. in the afternoon at 2 Eucharistic Stations were conducted this embracing prayers in honor of the Blessed Eucharist lasted 1 hourJ In the evening devotions in honor Of the Blessed Sacrament were conduct- ed at 7:30. On Friday at eight o'clockthe Mass of the Pre-san~tified was cele- brated and the veneration of the cross took place immediately after the Mass. The collection for the Holy Places was taken up and amounted to ~6.00. In the afternoon the Way of the Cross at two o'clock, conducted so as to last one hour, brought out a large number of wor- shippers. In the evening ab 7:30 devotions in honor of the Most Pre- cious Blood were hald: Saturday morning the services began at eight o'clock. During the entire week the" weather was anything but inviting. However, the faithful were never daunted and attended i~ large num- bei, s. Easter Sunday dawned bright and was ~n ideal day. The senior choir sang Valnety's Mass in "E" The church was filled. Many not of the faith attending. Telephone messages were received from Corning, Peach Orchard and Brookings expressing the regrets of many who on account of roads covered with water or bridges out were not able to be pres- ent. Benedictiqn with the Most [Blessed Sacrament followed by the Te Deum concluded the services. The collection for the seminary amounted to $25.00. When it is considered that this is only a Mission with few families who support a school with two,sisters in charge for a period of nine months and always meet the expenses of pastor and sis- ters the sum of $6.00 for the Holy ways of the world. Five short days elapse and we hear them cry "Away with Him, away with Him, crucify Him!" How many are there who assisted during the entire week known the world over as Holy Week, journeyed with Christ to the Mount of crucifixion declaring that they would not cause Him sorrow again Who on the Feast of His Resurrec- tion received Him into their Souls are already lapsing back into their old ways. Human nature is weak and should be compelled to be brougilt under the subjection of ~he Spirit--Cooperating with the graces God sends us will strengthen the soul so that the flesh must obey. On the Feast of St. George High Mass was song at eight o'clock. The junior choir furnished the music. St. George m numbered among the Seven gTeat Champions of Christen- dora and His feast has been celebrat- ed with solemnity since the fourth century--The attendance at Mass was lige that of a holiday of obliga= tion many receiving the Sacraments Mass was also celebrated on the following Sunday. Wilson's resi- dence was the only station visited during the month of April. Plans were made to visit the other points ~ut each had to be cancelled on ac- ount of water. Sunday, May 1st, the Feast of Sts. Phillip and James Mass was rea'd at eight o'clock. Before the Mass the children of the parish preceeded by cross bearer and accolytes marched in procession from St. Bernards School into the Church, escorting the" class of first Communicants and the ~astor. As they entered the church Mrs. Lawrence Dahmns presiding at the or'gan rendered a selection .in honor of the Queen of HeavenDur- ing the Mass special hymns appro- I priate for the occasion were render- ed in an impressive manner. Pray- ers before and after receiving the Guest of Heaven were devoutly said. The sermon theme was the love of Christ for Humanity--Our Saviour not satisfied with Dying upon the Cross for our redemption provided ]for our daily needs by instituting the Blessed Sacrament of the Altar where He dwells day and night a prisoner of our love---inviting and expecting His children to come to Him To visit Him--to eat His Sacred Flesh and to drink His Precious Blood. Christ said to His Apostles "Take ye and eat. . Do this for a, com- memoration of Me." "Who eats My Flesh and drinks My Blood shall have eternal life and I will raise him up on the last day." The older members were reminded of the joy of their First Holy Com- munion and to do all in their power to make the day a day ofspleasure for the Little Ones. They @ere also urged to frequently receive their Lord and Master in His Sacrament of love that~having loved and lived with Him here upon earth they may love Him with a greater love and dwell with Him for all eternity in the home which He has gone to pre- pare for them. In the afternoon at 2:00 p. m. The children bearing garlands were led in procession from the school to Che church. Arriving at the Statue of Our Lady they rendered in a beauti- ful manner a hymn in Her honor and: then placed their offering of flowers at-her feet. Mr. Jerome Scheller bore upon a tray the Crown which he gave to Miss Mary Frances Sell- meyer who crowned the Queen of Heaven as the Queen of May--Thus the two graduates of St. Bernards School for this year plighted their love and devotion of Our Queen and Our Mother--The a6t of Consecra- tion was then recited by Miss Mary FrancesFollowing this the rosary and Litany of Our Lady was recited by the entire Congregation. Bene- diction with the Most Blessed Sacra- ment brought the services of the day to a close. Mr. Henry Sellmeyer, Jr., acte~d as aster of ceremonies at the services in the morning and also in the after- noon--thereby assisting the pastor in making all go smooth and solemn for the Greater Honor and Gtory'0;f Godthe sanctification and edifica- tion of the worshippers. Nature united to make~ the day one long to be remembered by the b !REV. J. F. GALLONI OF LAKE VILLAGE PROVES FLOOD HERO Rev J F Gallom, parmh priest, Lake Village, Arkansas, has again served his community in a most dis- tinguished manner. Father Galloni an old resident of the Southeastern portion of the state, is regarded in his section as one of the most able men to meet such calamities as the present flood. Desha and Chicot counties are among the richest farming sections ]n the State and Lake Chicot is one of Arkansas' beauty spots. At Lake Village, a beautiful little city, built on the banks of this lake, there is real tragedy today. The new Parish School, just opened last fall is flooded with water. This building the result of many years of saving and hard work on the part of the Pastor and People is practically ruined. The Lake Village Parish is composed principally of Italians. Gallant Labors For nearly two weeks now. the Rev. J. F. Galhmi has carried on the fight against ~he floods. Father Gal- loni has resided in this section many years and is well versed in the ways o the Arkansas and Missi.ssippi Rivers. The U. S. Engineers have practically turned over to his sup- ervision a large section of the giant earthen embankment that stands as a last line of defense against the raging waters. Day and night loyal- ly assisted by his parishioners, the good priest has carried on his battle with the insensate force of the raging waters. In a levee fight there is no quarter and no respite. Everyone labors until exhaustion causes them to drop, and day and night the strug- gle goes on. More earth, more sand bags. White and black shoulder to shoulder they battle. Some times waist deep in seep water that chills to the very marrow of the human bones. Clothes wev, oftd~ without any food save a hurriedly~snatched sandwich ahd cup of coffee, a cigarette and back to the battle. So it goes on into the night when the bobbing lanterns are like fire flies and the crooning of the negroes rises and falls like a la- mentation above the roar 'of the an- gry waters. Through it all goes the tireless priest directing, encouraging, joking, while his heart is heavy with the terror of what he knows so well. Better than most of his people he can see the danger to what he has labored for, but for their sakes he must laugh. But even this labor is not enough. Word comes that the levee has col- lapsed in another section, that there are many in some district who are on top of barns or in trees to avoid the raging waters. Of course when this happens and it has happened a dozen times in the past two weeks in south- east Arkansas, there is no means of transportation save by boat. The pastor leaves his men on the levee and bids them carry on, while he seeks his own boat, loads it with food and blankets and starts his cruise through the oveifflow country seek- ing these refugees. Such an expedi- tion is no activity for an amateur. There~ are numerous crosscurrents torrents, in this floodwater. Trees are hidden by it but they are near enough ot the surface to destroy a boat. Then there is always the danger of being swept out into the current of some river which has lost its identit4f in the flood. It takes a cool and ex- perienced person to maneuver a small power boat through this un- charted sea, that covers farms and forests. Father J. F. Galloni has been do- ing just this work for over two weeks now. When Sunday came he gather- ed his people to the church, the only home they have. For an hour they the devotion in the afternoon were faithful of St. George. The attend- ance at both Mass in the morning and among the largest on record. Those to receive Holy Communion on this occasiton were Clare Engel, Hilda McConnell, Florence McCon- nell, and Lillian Wilkens---After the Mass the First Communicants ~with the pastor partook of a. sumptious breakfast at the home o~ Mr. and Mrs. Frank McConnell. The table was beautifully decorated with flowers of the season. The center piece a cake The Lamb, Tipified the Lamb of God who was slain for the salvation of mankind. Friday, May 6th, First Friday of the Month Mass at eight o'clock fol- lowed by the regular First Friday devotions--Communion will be dis- tributed at six o'clock for those who wiiI not be able ~to attend Mass. lSunday, May 15th, the Third Sun- day of the Month---The Feast of St. John Baptist LaSalle Mass at eight o'clock--The Mass will be followed by May Devotions and close with Benediction with ~he Most Blessed Sacrament. i .................... .:. !i DIOCESAN AND MISSION COLLECTIONS ii ,1 ....... z.. ' ' Place and Parish. Little Rock Cathedral ........................ $ St. Ann's ............... St. Bartholomew's .............. St. Ed'ward's ....................... St. Mary's ....................... St. Patrick's .............. Our Lady of Good Counsel ............ Altus--Our Lady of Perpetual Help ...... Atkins- Assumption ............... B!ytheville--St. Peter's .................... Brinkley (District)- St. John's ............ Camden St. Louis' ............................... Center Ridge St. Januarius' .__2 .......... Charleston Sacred Heart .................. Clarksville Holy Redeemer .................. Conway St. Joseph's ..................... Carlisle St, R'ose's ..................................... Dixie St. Boniface ................................ E1 Dorado Holy Redeemer ...................... Engelberg St. John's ................... Eureka Springs St. Elizabeth's ........... Faye,tteville St. Joseph's .............. Fort Smi,th Immaculate Conception ....... ,St. Boniface's ......................... St. Jo~n's ........................ Helena St. Mary's ................... Hope Our Lady of Hope ttot Springs St. Mary-St. John .......... , _ !-Ioxie--Mary Immaculate Jonesboro St. Roman's ...................... Knobel St. George's .............. Lake Village--Our Lady of the Lake ....... 5icGehce St. Winand's ................ Marche Mos~ Pure Heart of Mary ....... Mena--St. Agnes' _ .................... Morrilton--Sacred Heart ................. Morrison's Bluff Sts. Petel and Paul ..... Newport--St. John's ................................. Oppelo St. Elizabeth's ........................... Paragould St. Mary's ...................... Paris St. Joseph's ............................... Pine Bluf~St. Joseph's ........................... St. Peter's .......................................... Pocahontas--St. Paul's ............................... Prairie View St. Meinrad's ....................... Rateliffe St. Anthony's ............................ St, Vincent--Our Lady of Perpetual Help__ Scranton St. Ignatius' .............................. gh.oa] Creek--St. Scbolastica's ................... glovactown Sts., Cyril-Methodius .............. Stuttgart--Holy Rosary ............................. Subiaco St. Benedict's .............................. Texarkana--St. Edward's .......................... Tontitown St. Joseph's ............................ Van Buren---St. Michael's ........................... Weiner---St. Anthony's ............................... Little Rock Council Official Note' MEXICO D.C. Missions. Total I In our article 19.90 $ 30.10 $ 50.00i dealt with some of 3.56 6.20 9.85 activities of our order 2.00 3.50 5.50 esteem in which it 20.50 39.75 51.25 the Catholic world. 10.65 15.02 10.75 18.75 16.95 19.37 5.05 7.00 8.10 10.42 5.15 11.50 6.95 10.13 6.80 7.45 1.55 1.60 4.05 6.35 8.25 9.95 8.69 11.31 1.05 1.95 9.16 12.80 4.00 4.85 1.40 1.55 3.75 4.70 11.61 15.39 ]'1.05 18.00 4.35 5.90 17.70 12.50 25.67 ter in the Order's 29.50 I ing written. The 36.32bus raised one 12.05present the case 18.52to the American people. 16.65plete it will be another 17.08in our history and whe~ 14.25of Columbus have 3.15 count of their 10.40importance and 18.20 'I work is more fully 20.00 receive the of the Catholics of 3.00 the world. 21.96 Permanent 8.85 Outside the 3.95 is a general 8.45 I socially, politically 27.001 and commerce move as instance o 29.05 i ' f ~ome n~Y 10.25 ty such as the Black "30.20 or some sort of I 16.20 27.75 43.95 2.00 3.00 5.00 20.10 24.30 44.40 3.65 4.10 7.75 4.15 4.15 8.30 2.00 4.00 6.00 7.49 10.65 18.14 5.40 5.55 10.95 10.65 11.10 21.75 15.00 17.65 32.65 1.90 2.30 4.20 4.15 5.86 10.01 4.00 4.15 8.15 17.25 20.25 37.50 14.35 23.15 37.50 2.05 3.85 5.90 13.80 18.85 32.65 2.60 3.00 5.60 10.15 12.25 22.40 5.00 6.00 11.00 4.15 5.10 9.25 6.80 7.65 14.45 5.05 5.45 10.50 8.80 9.15 17.95 4.20 6.90 11.10 4.45 4.30 8.75 2.75 5.15 7.90 5.10 5.85 10.95 Total ..................................................... $ 406.25 $ REPORTING FOR JANUARY LIST Center Ridge---St. Januarius ..................... $ 1.30 $ Fayetteville St. Joseph's ........................... 5.10 Morrilton Sacred Heart ........................... 10.15 Tontitown St. Joseph's ............................. 6.20 Total ................. : ....................................... $ 22.75 $ Previously reported for January, 1927 ........ 413.28 Total ~or Jonuary .................................... $ 436.03 RECAPITULATION January ....................................................... $ 436.03 February ........................................................ 406.25 538.50 $ 944.75 1.45 $ 2.75 5.05 10.15 10.90 21.05 6.00 12.20 23.40 $ 46A5 563.51 976.79 $ 586.91 $1,022.94 $ 586.91 $1,022.94 538.50 944.75 $1,125.41 $1,967.69 Total .................................................. $ 842.28 LITTLE ROCK COLLEGE NOTES (Continued from page 3.) M.orris Hall o the Campus where the exercises of the day will be held. The day will be given over to the festivities which ~znark this occasion, and a banquet will be given in the evening for the entire senior class. Tuesday, May 31st, Alumni Day, will witness the annual struggle for, supremacy between the Alumni and ~he College Baseball team on the White City field. This will take place in the afternoon at 3 o'clock. At the conclusion of the game, the Sen- iors will be the guests of the Alumni at the Annual Meeting and Banquet which will be held in Byrne hall. The annual election of officers for the Alumni will be held at the meet- ing, and the graduates will be duly initiated into the Alumni Associa- tion with suitable ceremonies. It will be one of the gala events of the closing days of the seniors. Wednesday, June 1st. Solemn Re- quiem High Mass will be celebrated. in St. John's Chapel, Morris Hall, for the deceased members of the Alumni Association, attended by the mem- bers of the Alumni and the gradu- ates. The Mass will be sung by the President of the college, the Rev. left the river with only a watcher every few hundred yards, while priest and people offered the Easter Mass for the faithful assembled and distant and loved ones in danger. While the priest was engaged, the Sisters were not idle. They were communicating with the scattered farm families. Cooking and prepar- ing food and supplies for the refu- gces and caring for the children of parents who were engaged in the struggle. They are helping nurses and doctors in~ their work of preven- tion an4 keeping little minds occu- pied and tur~ed from the tragedy, they are 'living through. In other sections, notably at Pine Bluff, the Rev. John Thompson S. S. J., in charge of the negro church there has opened his school to the flood refugees of that section. There are at present over a hundred negro refugees housed in the parish school. This work is being carried on through, the Red Cross under the direction of Father Thompson assist- ed by the Sisters in charge of the school and" Miss Blanche Tomaschie- wski, R. N. In the mission territories of Brink- ley and Jonesboro the priests are working throughout refugee camps seeking their people assisting all they can without regard to condition or color. But the real work of the priests in the mission when the people re- turn to their homes. When he goes back to work on his little churches that will be filled with mud and slime when the water goes down. Then will come the test, to keep up courage of priests and people for the worl~ when they behold so much labor and so much hope destroyed. Through the co-operation of Car- dinal Faulhaber a chapel has been "in- stalled in the principal railroad sta- tions of Munich to enable travelers to. hear Mass ~n Sundays. The sta- tion master often serves the early Sunday Mass himself. James P. Moran, assisted by mem- bers of the Faculty. Reunions of the various classes will be held during the day, with the director. This aside from a united freedom of well as all others, as much unison Scientists and the it was to counterac aloof.~c~;s that of the first problems cils had to tackle of the main r ment of pe 30 years ago since the ent Home was erected Council the Orders activity led nationally the first duties of a vide itself with a should be a Catholic It is interesting to ful spread of this how today Knights Homes are dotted all American co buildings are a ment to the tion~of the local stance at San Home cost $250,0( and Denver $200, umbus, Ohio, $100, land $110,000.00 course numerous small of our "oWn but one of the long list that comes u is the little Council Idaho, with a 100 members who home. It should be some of our sas for while able features or rented quarters chambers, billiard, rooms, yet the Coa~c* ~ing, has a different bestowes a sense of torship and builds pride upon which action to re ence. State and dertake many portance to the are endowed, free Catholic College employment suitable to protect wards of State or C for the children of All these are the tion of the activities who equally by living are small way the missio~ late of the laity: . We have-in briel, origin, growth and o the Order a few of its major Their policies have servdtive,~ their thusiastic and realized that the~ lead in promoting cation in all its Charity (now thropy). This is their glory'. Next Week we s~al portant local work ( coul~l undertake, it cessary, and the of knighthood. Bro. Math. Durst St. Francis HosP Twentieth Annual graduation exer-] Springs, Colo., and cises at which the Bishop will present line or two from race, on the Oval, in the eve~ing at Knights and eight o'clock. :A procession of the graduates escorting the Bishol~ to the platform will precede the exer- cises at which the Bishoy will present the Degrees to the graduates. ,She: "What have you in the shape of bananas .today?" Street Merchant: "Cucumbers,1 lady." Garstka is at the and Bro. Kni ed to pay him a "You're lookin' "Aye, I've bee~ the doctors pendix." "These doctors'l It's a peety ye wife's na~ne." I